Here to serve the common good.

Two legacies of caring.
One ministry of change.

CommonSpirit Health™ is committed to building healthier communities, advocating for those who are poor and vulnerable, and innovating how and where healing can happen—both inside our hospitals and out in the community.

The result of years of planning, CommonSpirit was created by the alignment of Catholic Health Initiatives and Dignity Health as a single ministry in early 2019.

Our commitment to serve the common good is delivered through the dedicated work of thousands of physicians, advanced practice clinicians, nurses, and staff; through clinical excellence delivered across a system of hospitals and other care centers covering 21 states, and accessible to nearly one in four U.S. residents; and through more than $4 billion annually in charity care, community benefits, and government program services.

Our calling is in our name.

The CommonSpirit name was inspired by scripture: “Now to each one the manifestation of the Spirit is given for the common good” (1 Corinthians 12:7 NIV). Those words motivate and guide us every day. They celebrate the healing gift of compassion that God gives to us all, and they remind us of our calling to serve the common good.

“Now to each one the manifestation of the Spirit is given for the common good.”

Our mission

As CommonSpirit Health, we make the healing presence of God known in our world by improving the health of the people we serve, especially those who are vulnerable, while we advance social justice for all.

This statement is a formal declaration of CommonSpirit’s purpose; an affirmation of why we exist. Our Mission Statement is just 35 words, but there are profound ideas behind them.

“As CommonSpirit Health,” for instance, celebrates the union of two influential health ministries into one national health ministry. “We make the healing presence of God known” is, of course, the reason CommonSpirit exists; it’s the calling that has drawn us all together. “In our world” affirms our commitment to people and communities on a local, national, and even global scale.

“Improving the health of the people we serve” speaks to the physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects of people along the entire health continuum. It reminds us that we serve our patients, their families, our communities—and also each other.

“Those who are vulnerable” signals our dedication to helping people as they experience the fragility of the human condition. And, “advance social justice for all” is our pledge to leverage our talents and partnerships for the benefit of the common good, and to listen and be transformed by the voices we hear.

The participating
congregations behind
CommonSpirit Health:

  • Benedictine Sisters of Annunciation Monastery
  • Benedictine Sisters of Mother of God Monastery
  • The Congregation of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word
  • Dominican Sisters of Peace
  • Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena
  • Franciscan Sisters of Little Falls, Minnesota
  • Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati
  • Sisters of Charity of Nazareth
  • Sisters of Mercy of the Americas, West Midwest Community
  • The Sisters of St. Dominic, Congregation of the Most Holy Rosary
  • Sisters of St. Francis of Colorado Springs
  • Sisters of St. Francis of Penance and Christian Charity, St. Francis Province
  • Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia
  • Sisters of St. Francis of the Immaculate Heart of Mary
  • Sisters of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary
  • Sylvania Franciscans
  • Third Order of St. Dominic, Congregation of the Most Holy Name

Visit our facilities online.

From one hospital in 1854 to forty-one hospitals today (plus many more neighborhood clinics and care centers), Dignity Health has always remained focused on the compassionate care it brings to its communities.

The roots of Catholic Health Initiatives literally go back hundreds of years. Over time, CHI has earned a national reputation for providing a wide range of clinical expertise, and for advocating an ambitious agenda of social justice.

When was CommonSpirit created?

The alignment between CHI and Dignity Health closed on January 31, 2019. The ministry’s Board of Stewardship Trustees was announced on October 16, 2018.

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What will happen to the Dignity Health and CHI names?

Our hospitals and clinics will continue to operate under their current names in the communities we serve.

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How many people work for CommonSpirit?

More than 150,000 physicians, nurses, caregivers, and other staff are employed by CommonSpirit. In addition, thousands of independent physicians serve patients in a CHI or Dignity Health facility, as do thousands more volunteers.

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How many people are served by CommonSpirit?

Our hospitals and care centers cover 21 states, and are accessible to nearly one in four U.S. residents. Last year, Dignity Health and CHI treated 20 million patients, combined. With a larger geographic footprint representing diverse populations across the U.S., we will be a leader in advancing the shift from sick care to well care, and more effectively advocating for the growing number of people who are poor and vulnerable.

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Why did CHI and Dignity Health come together?

By combining our complementary resources and capabilities, we are creating a stronger system with increased investments in critical areas that will advance the quality of care and access to it. CommonSpirit has the size and ability to scale best-in-class clinical service lines; recruit and retain top talent; standardize operations to improve quality and reduce the cost of care; and advocate more effectively for all people, especially those who are poor and vulnerable. Our combined strengths allow us to expand access to outpatient and virtual care settings, offering care closer to home. We will also continue to invest in clinical programs to keep aging populations and people suffering from chronic illnesses healthier. Further, CommonSpirit’s scale also allows us to increase our investments in digital technologies and innovations (e.g., telemedicine programs, stroke robots, etc.) that can create a more personalized and efficient care experience, regardless of location.

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How is CommonSpirit better-positioned to influence health care policy?

With a larger geographic footprint representing diverse populations across the U.S., we will be a leader in advancing the shift from sick care to well care, and more effectively advocating for the growing number of people who are poor and vulnerable.

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Where is CommonSpirit headquartered, and how was that location chosen?

Our national office is in Chicago—chosen for its central location, convenient access to all parts of the country where our ministries are located, and a sound infrastructure to support a national organization.

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Will all CommonSpirit facilities be Catholic?

Consistent with the heritage of our two legacy organizations, the new ministry will be Catholic. We have a long history of partnering with providers of all faiths and backgrounds, and that will continue. A number of facilities in our system have not been Catholic in the past, and their status will not change. All of our facilities will continue to operate in alignment with CommonSpirit’s mission and values.

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How will this alignment affect the communities we serve?

People will continue to receive high-quality care at the hospitals and facilities in their communities. The Dignity Health–CHI alignment builds on the complementary strengths of both systems, creating a new organization committed to leading clinical practices and healing body, mind, and spirit. The new system will focus on improving the health of people in our communities by standardizing the way we treat people—using innovative, evidence-based protocols to help better manage health care costs for people, communities, and employers. CommonSpirit will also provide more communities with access to research and innovative technologies (e.g., precision medicine cancer care) that are often not available to community-based physicians.

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